What a hard day! You’re stressed out, so you reach for a cup of chamomile tea to calm your inner self. But what about your outer self? What about your complexion?

Chamomile’s healing properties do wonders. Its anti-inflammatory nature will soothe redness and itching, reduce swelling and heat associated with dermatitis and prevent inflammation and negative reactions due to irritating cosmetics. Its antiseptic qualities destroy bacteria, and the plant’s anodyne–which is similar to an analgesic–relieves pain. The herb’s vasoconstrictive abilities aid the narrowing and healing of unsightly facial capillaries.

Taking chamomile to cure what ails you is not a new trend. The herb was used regularly by the Ancient Egyptians. It is commonly found growing wild in fields of Europe. The Europeans became aware of the plant’s medicinal benefits, and it is now specifically cultivated for that purpose.

Through steam-distillation of the plant’s leaves and flowers, a powerful essential oil is created. There are two types of oil; Roman chamomile oil is more frequently used since it is lighter in color than German chamomile oil. They both produce a sweet, fruity and warm fragrance. With all these curative factors, it isn’t a surprise that chamomile plays an important role in face creams, body lotions, and hair products.

Although chamomile is usually non-irritating, those individuals who are allergic to chrysanthemums, ragweed or asters may have an allergic reaction to the plant. Hayfever, asthma, and hives might occur. To be on the safe side, do a patch test to find out if you are sensitive or not.

Skin Saver

Everyone needs beauty sleep, and a drink of sedative-like chamomile tea before bed will do the trick. By getting the shut-eye you deserve, you give your skin a chance to heal and recover from daily stress.

Night cream, which remains on the skin undisturbed for many hours, is a beneficial beauty treatment. Cream containing chamomile, rich emollients and moisturizers have restorative and hydrating qualities. Chamomile can also be found in make-up removers, wrinkle and fine line removers, and after-sun face-care lotion. It protects and heals the sensitive skin around the eyes, and the face.

Synthetic dish detergents, shampoos,and soaps are one of the major causes of unhealthy skin. The detergent in the products destroys the hydrolipid and acid covering of skin. It takes hours for this to be restored and in the meantime, your skin is vulnerable to the ravages of bacteria and environmental pollutants.

A natural soap formulated with essential healing oils such as chamomile, emollients, vitamins and phospholipids (an essential fatty acid emulsifier that dissolves the oils directly into skin layer) will repair the skin and control its excessive oiliness, and dryness.

Heavenly Hair

What do acne and dandruff have in common? Both conditions are the result of over-production of oil from the sebaceous glands. The dreaded pimple can be kept under control by using chamomile-based products, such as astringents that provide intensive cleansing treatments, facials and steams which open pores and moisturize the skin. Chamomile will help to prevent and treat blackheads and acne.

Increased oiliness of the scalp can be treated similarly. An oily scalp produces excess scalp cells that end up drying out and falling off in patches of dandruff. Once you have the excess oiliness in check, you can say goodbye to this type of dandruff.

You don’t have to buy a different kind of shampoo for dry flaky dandruff. Chamomile can correct the scalp’s oil and water balance so that the scalp is not overly dry.

Chamomile is a familiar ingredient in natural hair lightening products, conditioners and shampoos. Chamomile strengthens and revitalizes the outer layers of hair. It minimizes damage caused by internal ailments, toxic chemical hair products, sun, harsh detergents, heat from styling appliances and the environment.

Chamomile will beautify you inside and out. Whether it is in a shampoo, facial cream, or a cup of tea, you will feel its extraordinary effects.

About the Author

Cindy Mortimer is a kineseologist living a holistic, vegetarian life in Toronto, ON.