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Eggs

The misunderstood protein

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Eggs

Often vilified, eggs have had to fight to regain their place in our diet

Often vilified, eggs have had to fight to regain their place in our diet. For years they were portrayed as bad for us, containing too much cholesterol and fat. Thankfully, those days are over.

The Heart Foundation confirms that “all Australians, including people with diabetes or metabolic syndrome, who follow a healthy balanced diet low in saturated fat can eat up to six eggs each week without increasing their risk of cardiovascular disease”.

Indeed, eggs are one of the best fast foods available on the market. They are economical and provide a host of nutrients and vitamins our bodies need; they come pre-packaged and can be taken on the road or enjoyed at home at any time of day; and they can be eaten on their own or as part of a multitude of sweet and savoury dishes. One popular legend holds that a chef’s white hat has 100 pleats—one for each way an egg can be cooked.

Are all eggs the same?

Egg colour is not based on the diet the chicken eats, but rather on its breed. However, the chicken’s diet is directly linked to the internal characteristics of an egg. For example, eggs rich in omega-3 fatty acids are laid by hens that eat a diet rich in omega-3s, such as linseed.

For the well-being of the chickens, free-range organic eggs are a must. Plus, pasture-raised free-range hens that forage largely for their own food may produce eggs with more healthy fats and vitamins A and E than standard factory eggs.

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