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Fire It up on Father’s Day

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This month, we’re celebrating all the special dads, dad figures, and dad mentors out there with a collection of delicious recipes for Father’s Day. We’ve jazzed up the BBQ with some gutsy flavours coupled with options to satisfy the vegetarian and vegan in the crowd. Plus, we’ve provided a few hints for pairing the best-flavoured suds with your meal.

Every dish in our Dad’s Day menu is perfect for serving either outdoors or in, depending on the weather. Make it extra special by gifting your “dad” with a new apron and some BBQ tools. Then be sure to line up family members as sous chefs and give your dad the attention and help he deserves.

Whether they’re flipping burgers or tempeh patties, grilling up planked fish, or assembling a massive salad—a little help on the sidelines will score high on the gratitude scale. For extra points, roll up your sleeves and offer to do all the cleanup.

01

Bánh Mi Burgers with a Kick

Bánh Mi Burgers with a Kick
Grilled Citrus Chipotle Icelandic Cod

Cedar-plank grilling is an exceptional way to cook fish without fear of overcooking. Hints of wood smoke penetrate the flesh to add depth while retaining moisture. Cod is commonly available already smoked in many stores, but it can often taste oversalted and dry. Our version suggests using fresh cod from Iceland; grilling on soaked cedar provides smoky overtones while keeping it moist and tasty. Delicious with a new-potato salad and grilled veggies.

Grilled New Potatoes and Lentils with Creamy Lemon Dressing

Early summer potatoes, cooked and grilled, are just the ticket for this fabulous salad. Coupled with lentils, they’re a delicious add-on to any meal plan. This recipe offers an added bonus: it can be made in stages, so you’re not cooking all afternoon.

Everything-But-Meat Salad

If there’s a vegan or vegetarian in the crowd, then this dish will be sure to please. Chock full of complementary textures and flavours, it not only qualifies as eye candy, but is also a substantial stand-alone meal—a stunning meal in a dish!

Pork Tenderloin with Espresso BBQ Sauce

Coffee-flavoured BBQ sauce? Why not? It’s a strikingly flavourful combo—sweet, tangy, bold, and rich. It can be used not only on pork but on a variety of other meats. We marinated tenderloin in it and doubled up on the smoky flavour by grilling it on a cedar plank. Serve with a side order of grilled broccolini for extra yum.

GF Almond Tahini Ice Cream Cookie Cake

Ice cream cakes and/or cookies are everyone’s favourite. And here’s a great option for a delicious “Dad’s” cookie cake that’s gluten free! A simple-to-make cookie cake that’s made even easier when the dough is tossed together in a food processor. End a delicious Dad’s Day meal with this deliciously cool and creamy sweet dessert.

Quaffable beer tips

These days beer comes in a dizzying selection of flavours, in an equally diverse array of cans and bottles that bear labels with amazingly creative artwork. From large producers to microbreweries, there’s a flavoured beer to appeal to almost anyone.

For our recipes, we’ve provided our best recommendations based on the recipes, although there’s never just one truly perfect match. Here’s a layperson’s guide to flavours in a widely diverse selection. Let your own beer bias prevail!

IPA stands for India pale ale and is understood to be one of the first brews of the “craft” beer movement. There are many flavours in the IPA grouping, ranging from citrus high notes to hoppy and bitter overtones. Given the immense variety, a flight of IPAs covering a citrus note, hoppy tone, and herbal flavour would be the best way to cover all ranges of taste buds.

Lager is mild and easy to quaff for the beginner in the crowd. It’s a great bevvy for any grilled or chilled recipe. A honey-flavoured lager is an especially easy sipper. Pilsners fall into this grouping.

Pale ale, not to be confused with India pale ale, is blonde in colour and has light alcohol content with a hit of malt.

Stout is a dark and heavier brew stemming from unfermented sugars. Typically sweet overtones, roasted, and somewhat creamy on the tongue. Some brews come with hints of espresso and dark chocolate.

Porter is much like stout but with a greater suggestion of chocolate overtones.

Belgian beers cover the gamut from light to dark and hoppy to citrusy with an enhanced alcohol content.

Wheat beer, like the grain, is light in colour and in alcohol content—perfect for a summer day.

Sour beer is, as it’s called, “sour” as well as tart—perfect for someone with super discerning taste buds.

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Hot Stuff

Hot Stuff

If you’ve spent any time travelling around the globe, your burning lips have made you well aware of the way various guises of chili peppers have become a fixture of so many world cuisines. A papaya salad from a Thailand street market or a fragrant curry dished out by a family restaurant in southern India wouldn’t be the same without their chili punch. Just imagine eating street tacos in Mexico if they didn’t induce a few drops of sweat. What we typically eat in North America is relatively tame in comparison. Capable of turning the blandest soup or sauce into a palate-exploding triumph, cooking with chili peppers—from mild poblano to volcano-like habanero—will dial up the excitement of your dishes. Use them to accentuate both savoury and sweet ingredients. You don’t have to be a heat freak to enjoy eating chili peppers since their “spice” levels vary greatly—enough to suit all tastes. Beyond their culinary virtues, research suggests that hot peppers may literally be the “spice of life” by improving the chances for healthy longevity. It’s time to bring the heat into the kitchen, and let the table dares begin. Paging Dr. Pepper For flaming hot health, go ahead and turn up the heat. A recent study from the American Heart Association found that people who eat chili peppers regularly may be 26 percent less likely to die of heart disease and 23 percent less likely to die of cancer than those who don’t. While this investigation can’t prove cause and effect, nor did it nail down how many or which chili peppers lower the risk the most, it’s believed that capsaicin—the compound that gives chilies their fiery kick—can be good for our health by reducing inflammation and even bolstering metabolism. More research is needed, but if you like to spike your meals with chili peppers, you may reap some health and longevity rewards for doing so regularly. Handle with care When preparing chili peppers, if your fingers come into contact with the ribs or seeds (the hottest part of the pepper) and then sensitive areas such as your eyes, you’ll likely feel a very unpleasant burn that could bring you to tears. Very hot peppers can damage your eyes and burn the skin. After slicing any hot peppers be sure to immediately wash your hands with hot, soapy water. You should also clean the knife and cutting board before proceeding with your recipe. To be safe, you can also wear a pair of gloves while handling chili peppers, especially those that rank very high on the heat scale, so the volatile oils will not get on your skin. Contrary to popular belief, most of the capsaicin in chili peppers is found in their inner white membranes and not the seeds. So, if you want to moderate the heat of a pepper, be sure to strip the membrane and the seeds, though doing so may dial down the health benefits. Cream of the crop In general, select peppers that are firm, have vibrant, shiny skin, and feel heavy for their size. Try to avoid peppers that are limp or shrivelled and have soft spots or bruises. When the good ones are brought home, they should last in your fridge when stored in a paper or cloth bag for at least two weeks. Dynamic duo Heat intensifies the flavour of sweet ingredients, while sugars tend to tame “spicy” ingredients and highlight their fruity notes. This is why delicious results always come when you spike chocolate cake or pudding with a hit of chili pepper.

Fire It up on Father’s Day

Fire It up on Father’s Day

This month, we’re celebrating all the special dads, dad figures, and dad mentors out there with a collection of delicious recipes for Father’s Day. We’ve jazzed up the BBQ with some gutsy flavours coupled with options to satisfy the vegetarian and vegan in the crowd. Plus, we’ve provided a few hints for pairing the best-flavoured suds with your meal. Every dish in our Dad’s Day menu is perfect for serving either outdoors or in, depending on the weather. Make it extra special by gifting your “dad” with a new apron and some BBQ tools. Then be sure to line up family members as sous chefs and give your dad the attention and help he deserves. Whether they’re flipping burgers or tempeh patties, grilling up planked fish, or assembling a massive salad—a little help on the sidelines will score high on the gratitude scale. For extra points, roll up your sleeves and offer to do all the cleanup. Quaffable beer tips These days beer comes in a dizzying selection of flavours, in an equally diverse array of cans and bottles that bear labels with amazingly creative artwork. From large producers to microbreweries, there’s a flavoured beer to appeal to almost anyone. For our recipes, we’ve provided our best recommendations based on the recipes, although there’s never just one truly perfect match. Here’s a layperson’s guide to flavours in a widely diverse selection. Let your own beer bias prevail! IPA stands for India pale ale and is understood to be one of the first brews of the “craft” beer movement. There are many flavours in the IPA grouping, ranging from citrus high notes to hoppy and bitter overtones. Given the immense variety, a flight of IPAs covering a citrus note, hoppy tone, and herbal flavour would be the best way to cover all ranges of taste buds. Lager is mild and easy to quaff for the beginner in the crowd. It’s a great bevvy for any grilled or chilled recipe. A honey-flavoured lager is an especially easy sipper. Pilsners fall into this grouping. Pale ale , not to be confused with India pale ale, is blonde in colour and has light alcohol content with a hit of malt. Stout is a dark and heavier brew stemming from unfermented sugars. Typically sweet overtones, roasted, and somewhat creamy on the tongue. Some brews come with hints of espresso and dark chocolate. Porter is much like stout but with a greater suggestion of chocolate overtones. Belgian beers cover the gamut from light to dark and hoppy to citrusy with an enhanced alcohol content. Wheat beer , like the grain, is light in colour and in alcohol content—perfect for a summer day. Sour beer is, as it’s called, “sour” as well as tart—perfect for someone with super discerning taste buds.