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Recent research gives new meaning to the term "sweet tooth"

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Recent research gives new meaning to the term "sweet tooth"

A recent study from the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that those with a weakness for sweets are more likely to be sweet.

A recent study from the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that those with a weakness for sweets are more likely to be sweet, or, in the researcher’s terms, to have “self-reports of agreeableness.”

The report, which included a series of five studies, showed that those who had a preference for sweet foods not only perceived themselves as more friendly, they were also more likely to volunteer and participate in community action events (such as cleaning up after a flood). The report also revealed that people who eat sweets are perceived as more friendly by complete strangers.

Unfortunately, the study doesn’t suggest we stop off at our local corner store to stack up on bonbons just to increase our likeability factor. However, a little healthy sweet here and there never hurt anyone. And if a fondness for sweets indicates a happier person, and happy people live longer (according to a recent study of 5,000 participants), then perhaps people who love sweets live longer. Okay, the last deduction is a stretch, but we can dream.

To boost your likeability factor (or maybe your grumpy neighbour’s), but not to the detriment of your health, whip up one of these healthy sweets recipes and see for yourself.

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