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BPA linked to behavioural issues in young children

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BPA linked to behavioural issues in young children

A recent study has linked Bisphenol-A (BPA) to anxious, depressed, and hyperactive behavioural issues in young children.

A recent study has linked Bisphenol-A (BPA) to behavioural issues in young children.

The researchers examined the behaviour of three-year-old children in relation to their BPA exposure in the womb as well as during childhood and determined that those who have been exposed to BPA in gestation had anxious, hyperactive, and depressed behaviours. Interestingly, girls experienced the greatest behavioural issues.

The Canadian government has labeled BPA toxic due to its hormone-disrupting properties and harmful effects on the aquatic environment. Until very recently, BPA was used in plastic baby bottles, further exposing young children and infants. Nevertheless, it continues to be used in many consumer products.

BPA is found in hard, clear, polycarbonate plastics (labelled #7), including water bottles and food storage containers. Food cans are also lined with the substance, which has been shown to leach into the food. Even thermal paper such as receipts, contain BPA.

Children and infants are especially susceptible to environmental toxins such as BPA, as they are growing and developing. The researchers suggest that parents should try to reduce their child’s exposure to BPA by limiting canned and packaged foods, number 7 plastics, and receipts.

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