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Can Research Outsmart Eternal Wisdom?

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During our lifetime, we have seen tremendous advances in all areas of technology. We are rapidly gaining knowledge and new insights as never before. Experts estimate that our scientific intelligence triples every year. This also seems to be true in medical science.

During our lifetime, we have seen tremendous advances in all areas of technology. We are rapidly gaining knowledge and new insights as never before. Experts estimate that our scientific intelligence triples every year. This also seems to be true in medical science. Not a day passes when we don't hear on the radio or read in the paper about a breakthrough or medical advance.

There's always exciting news about possible cancer cures, treatments for obesity and diabetes control, fat busters and cholesterol flushes, bust enhancement pills, and of course, new discoveries within the present research darling of genealogy. All of a sudden every malady seems to be related to and can be blamed on our genetic structure.

And yet, if we consider all the "breakthroughs" that have been discovered in the last few years, one wonders why cancer has not yet been beaten. Why are more people diagnosed every year? And why are fatalities from other degenerative diseases also on the increase?

It looks like research is only treading water.

Don't get me wrong. I am not opposed to research, but I am convinced that it's done in the wrong areas and with the wrong motives. Let me explain.

The other day I watched a TV report originating out of Brussels, Belgium. A pharmaceutical company was apparently on the verge of collapse. Their stocks had plummeted to rock bottom as news came out that five out of six of their latest pharmaceutical products had to be withdrawn from the market because users had developed severe--and even fatal--side-effects.

The spokesperson for the manufacturer admitted what was now of highest priority to the company--namely, to apply for more research funds to develop another new drug that could then be announced as a breakthrough. The two reasons he gave: first, to regain the trust of the investors so that the shares would rise again. Second, to prevent the flow of research subsidies from being cut off, which could eventually happen if no breakthrough was announced.

This is disgusting. Where are the morals and ethics in research? Do human lives still count? What about your health and mine? Or is medical research all about money, stock market shares and profits? It certainly looks that way.

Whatever happened to the Hippocratic oath? "First do no harm." To this day, all doctors must swear this oath when they are appointed to their profession. Centuries ago, the famous Greek doctor and father of medicine, Hippocrates (460-377 BC), came up with a few fundamental rules for staying healthy. If those in the industrialized world would abide by these pearls of wisdom, degenerative disease would be significantly reduced, the high cost of our health-care system would be miraculously solved and we wouldn't need to spend billions of dollars looking for "cures."

Consume primarily fresh, vegetarian food. Food of animal sources should be used very sparingly. Modern scientific researchers of whole foods nutrition lead by Drs. Bircher-Benner, Leitzmann, Bruker, Kollath and others have confirmed the value of this diet and the thesis of Hippocrates.

Fast twice a year. Throughout the ages, fasting has been recognized as a holistic approach to detoxification. In most religions, fasting plays a significant role in cleansing the body and in preparation for repentance and spiritual insight. Our society is rediscovering this eternal truth.

Get outdoors for a daily workout, followed by a full body massage with oil. Exercise promotes good health. Hippocrates knew it and so, too, are we relearning to keep fit by training the muscles and increasing the blood circulation. Sweating promotes the elimination of toxins through the skin, and the combination with a full body massage relaxes and balances the entire body, mind and soul.

This concise and time-honoured health plan is logical. It's so basic that it can be understood by anyone. But what's the catch? Maybe it's too cheap and easy. Maybe it doesn't turn a profit for big companies and the only people who benefit are those who follow it. And maybe that's why millions of dollars are still spent looking for miracle breakthroughs.

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