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Stuffed Onions with Kamut

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Onions are acknowledged for their healing properties while kamut, an ancient relative of modern durum wheat, is gaining popularity as a low-gluten grain that's well tolerated by wheat-sensitive people.

Onions are acknowledged for their healing properties while kamut, an ancient relative of modern durum wheat, is gaining popularity as a low-gluten grain that's well tolerated by wheat-sensitive people.

2 large Bermuda onions
1 Tbsp (15 ml) + 1 Tbsp (15 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
Sea salt, to taste
1 cup (250 ml) carrots, finely chopped
1 cup (250 ml) yellow bell pepper, finely chopped
1 cup (250 ml) red bell pepper, finely chopped
1 cup (250 ml) celery, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups (500 ml) kamut grains, cooked
1 cup (250 ml) vegetable stock
2 Tbsp (30 ml) butter
2 tsp (10 ml) rosemary
1 cup (250 ml) mixed sprouts such as lentil, pumpkin or sunflower
Vegetable salt, such as Herbamare, to taste

Preheat the oven to 380°F (190°C). Cut the caps off the onions and set them aside. Sprinkle onions with one tablespoon (15 ml) of olive oil and sea salt to taste. Replace caps and bake onions for 15 to 20 minutes until soft and golden. Remove from oven, cool slightly then scoop out the insides, chop and set them aside.

Meanwhile, saut?arrot, peppers, celery and garlic in one tablespoon (15 ml) of olive oil for two to three minutes. Stir in chopped onion and cooked kamut. Add vegetable stock, butter and rosemary; simmer until all liquid is evaporated. Season to taste with vegetable salt. Stuff onions with the vegetable-kamut mixture. Garnish with sprouts and serve with a simple green salad.

Source: alive #231, January 2002

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