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Apple and Brie Omelette

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    Looking to change things up? Try adding a little apple to your morning omelette.

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    2 tsp (10 mL) butter, divided
    Granny Smith apple, peeled and thinly sliced
    Ground nutmeg, to taste
    1 tsp (5 mL) sugar
    2 eggs
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) water
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) chopped pecans
    3/4 oz (25 g) Brie cheese

    Heat a nonstick 8 in (20 cm) ovenproof skillet* over medium heat. Melt 1 tsp (5 mL) butter in skillet. Saut apple slices in butter until slightly transparent but not too soft, about 2 minutes. Sprinkle with nutmeg and sugar. Remove from pan and keep warm.

    Beat together eggs and water. Heat same skillet over medium-high heat. Melt remaining 1 tsp (5 mL) butter in skillet. Pour in egg mixture. As mixture sets at edges, with spatula, gently push cooked portions toward the centre. Tilt and rotate the pan to allow uncooked egg to flow into the empty spaces.

    When egg is almost set on surface but still looks moist, cover one half of the omelette with warm apple mixture and pecans. Slip spatula under the unfilled side and fold the omelette in half. Garnish with Brie cheese. Broil 1 to 2 minutes to melt cheese. Slide onto warm plate and serve immediately.

    Serves 1.

    *If skillet is not ovenproof, wrap handle with double thickness of aluminum foil.

    Tip

    Skillet is hot enough when a drop of water will roll around instead of bursting into steam immediately.

    Suggestion for a complete meal

    Serve with a glass of apple juice and a multi-grain toasted bagel followed by mixed berries.

    Each serving contains: 440 calories; 18 g protein; 30 g total fat (13 g sat. fat); 28 g carbohydrates; 3 g fibre; 360 mg sodium

    source: "Egg-stra! Egg-stra!", alive #315, Janury 2009

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    Apple and Brie Omelette

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