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Beet Carpaccio on Sautéed Greens

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    Beet Carpaccio on Sautéed Greens

    Beets are high in folic acid and potassium and are a good source of vitamins A and C.

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    4 medium gold coloured beets, crisp greens attached
    1/3 cup (80 mL) flaxseed oil
    2 Tbsp (30 mL) seasoned rice vinegar
    1/2 tsp (2 mL) Dijon mustard
    1/4 cup (60 mL) pine nuts, toasted
    1 cup (100 g) shaved Manchego cheese

    Trim beets, leaving roots intact. Set greens aside. Place in large pot of water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and gently boil beets until tender but still slightly firm when pierced with a skewer. Drain and cool.

    Wash and spin dry leaves. Place in saucepan with a little water and steam just until wilted. Drain well and coarsely chop.

    Combine oil, vinegar, and mustard in small bowl and whisk to blend. Drizzle 2 Tbsp (30 mL) over greens and toss to coat. Using tongs, divide into 4 servings and place a mound on each plate.

    Peel cooled beets; thinly slice on a mandolin or with a small sharp knife. Divide slices among 4 serving plates, fanning them over beet greens.

    Sprinkle with toasted pine nuts and shavings of Manchego cheese. Drizzle with remaining whisked dressing.

    Serves 4.

    Tip: Manchego substitute
    Can’t find Manchego cheese? No problem. You can substitute Pecorino Romano for the Manchego.

    Each serving contains:
    354 calories; 8 g protein; 32 g total fat (8 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 11 g carbohydrates; 3 g fibre; 225 mg sodium

    source: "Winter Veggies", alive #325, November 2009

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    Beet Carpaccio on Sautéed Greens

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