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Black and Blue Lemonade

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    Black and Blue Lemonade

    Made with late-summer blackberries and blueberries, this is a berry good take on traditional old-fashioned lemonade. Makes 8 cups (2 L).

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    4 lemons
    3 cups (750 mL) each blackberries and blueberries
    1/2 cup (125 mL) raw sugar or Sucanat
    1/4 cup (60 mL) maple syrup
    4 cups (1 L) very cold water

    Finely grate peel from 1 lemon. Squeeze juice from lemons and strain. You should have about 3/4 cup (180 mL).

    Place half the berries in blender. Add half the lemon peel, juice, sugar or Sucanat, syrup, and 1 cup (250 mL) water. Whirl until pur?. Pour through a fine mesh strainer. Using the back of spoon, press down on pulp; discard solids. (It’s laborious, but well worth the effort.) Repeat with remaining berries, lemon peel, juice, sugar, syrup, and 1 cup (250 mL) water.

    Pour strained juice into a pitcher and stir in remaining 2 cups (500 mL) water. If lemonade is too thick, thin to taste with more cold water. Serve chilled.

    Each 1/2 cup (125 mL) serving contains: 65 calories; 1 g protein; 0 g total fat (0 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 18 g carbohydrates; 3 g fibre; 2 mg sodium

    source: "Superfruits to the Rescue", alive #332, June 2010

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    Black and Blue Lemonade

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