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Brie and Wild Mushroom Phyllo

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    Brie and Wild Mushroom Phyllo

    Think of this as the phyllo-siphers scone: baked brie, wild mushrooms, and winter thyme wrapped in crisp bundles.

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    1 cup wild mushrooms (any variety, fresh is best)
    2 tsp (10 mL) extra virgin olive oil
    2 tsp (10 mL) fresh chopped thyme or 1 tsp (5 mL) dried
    Salt and pepper
    1/4 cup (60 mL) red wine vinegar
    4 sheets of phyllo pastry
    1/4 cup (60 mL) melted butter
    7 oz (200 g) brie

    Sauté mushrooms in olive oil over medium heat until tender, about 4 minutes. Season with thyme, salt, and pepper. Deglaze by pouring vinegar into pan and stirring well. Reduce heat to low for 1 minute. Remove mushrooms from pan and refrigerate to cool.

    Brush 2 sheets of phyllo with melted butter. Extend the length of each sheet by placing a second sheet of phyllo along top edges; press flat to join. Cut phyllo in half lengthwise to create four long sheets. Divide brie into 4 portions and place at bottom of each sheet, leaving room around edges. Spoon mushroom mixture over brie, leaving room around edges.

    Brush lengths of phyllo with melted butter. Tuck side edges of phyllo over brie and mushroom mixture to prevent any from spilling out and then roll up phyllo, starting at brie. Brush outsides of phyllo bundles with remaining melted butter and place on baking sheet, being careful not to let bundles touch. Refrigerate until ready to bake.

    Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C) and bake 7 minutes. Turn bundles and bake another 7 minutes or until golden brown. Serves 4.

    source: "The Gramercy Guide to Better Cooking", alive #279, January 2006

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    Brie and Wild Mushroom Phyllo

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