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Broccoli Pesto

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    Broccoli Pesto

    When we crave something fresh in the throes of winter, this is a wonderful alternative to the more summery basil pesto. If you are allergic to nuts, substitute roasted chickpeas for hazelnuts.

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    1/4 cup (60 mL) hazelnuts
    2 cups (500 mL) broccoli florets
    1 cup (250 mL) parsley (leaves and tender stems only)
    2 Tbsp (30 mL) mint leaves
    1/2 tsp (2 mL) lemon zest
    1 to 2 garlic cloves, minced
    2 tsp (10 mL) extra-virgin olive oil
    3 Tbsp (45 mL) nutritional yeast
    1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt

    Preheat oven to 400 F (200 C).

    Spread hazelnuts in single layer on rimmed baking sheet. Toast in oven until skins split and flesh turns golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes. While still hot, rub hazelnuts in clean kitchen towel to remove skins (some will remain). Set aside.

    Meanwhile, steam broccoli until just tender and bright green, about 6 minutes. Rinse under cold water and let drain on paper towel-lined plate.

    In bowl of food processor, add hazelnuts and pulse until coarsely chopped. Scrape down sides of bowl and add remaining ingredients. Process, pausing to scrape down sides of bowl as needed, until smooth.

    Transfer to airtight container and store in refrigerator until needed. Broccoli pesto will keep for up to 1 week.

    Makes about 1 cup/250 mL pesto (8 servings).

    Each serving contains: 67 calories; 4 g protein; 4 g total fat (0 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 5 g carbohydrates (1 g sugars, 1 g fibre); 90 mg sodium

    source: "Cabbages, Broccoli, and Cauliflower", alive #361, November 2012

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    Broccoli Pesto

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