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Dark Hot Chocolate

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    Dark Hot Chocolate

    A piece of dark chocolate a day may keep heart disease at bay. German researchers found that people who ate an average of 7.5 g of dark chocolate daily had lower blood pressure and an 11 percent reduced risk of developing heart disease than those who ate 1.7 g of chocolate. The abundance of disease-fighting flavonols found in cocoa is thought to be behind this heart-healthy effect.

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    Make it:

    1 cup (250 mL) skim milk
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) dark, unsweetened cocoa powder
    1/2 tsp (2 mL) vanilla extract
    1 tsp (5 mL) honey

    In saucepan, bring milk to a boil; remove from heat. Stir in cocoa powder, vanilla, and honey. Pour into a mug and top with a sprinkle of cinnamon.

    Serves 1.

    Each serving contains: 155 calories; 9 g protein; 3 g total fat (2 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 26 g carbohydrates; 2 g fibre; 109 mg sodium

    source: "Snack Time", alive #352, February 2012

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    Dark Hot Chocolate

    Directions

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