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Dragon Boat Rice Bowl with Miso Tofu Dressing

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    Serves 4

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    The tofu dressing goes well with a variety of salads and grilled vegies. Here it’s featured with brown basmati rice and crisp vegetables for a satisfying vegetarian meal.

    Dressing

    125 g organic firm tofu
    2 Tbsp (40 ml) seasoned rice vinegar
    1 1/2 Tbsp (30 ml) white miso paste
    3 tsp (15 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
    1/4 cup (60 ml) water
    3 tsp (15 ml) peeled and grated fresh ginger
    1 garlic clove, crushed
    1/4 tsp (1 ml) dried red chilli flakes

    Rice Bowl

    3 cups (750 ml) cooked brown basmati rice
    2 large carrots, peeled and cut into matchsticks
    2 zucchini, cut into matchsticks
    1 bunch silverbeet or kale, finely shredded
    1 cup (250 ml) alfalfa sprouts
    4 spring onions, finely chopped
    Bunch of coriander
    3 tsp (15 ml) toasted sesame seeds

    Combine dressing ingredients in blender or food processor. Whirl until very smooth. Add a little more water if needed. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

    Slightly warm dressing in small saucepan, whisking to keep it creamy. Do not boil.

    Place 3/4 cup (180 ml) cooked rice in bowl. Drizzle 1 1/2 Tbsp (30 ml) warmed dressing over rice and gently toss to coat. Garnish with carrots, zucchini and silverbeet. Drizzle with desired amount of remaining dressing and top with sprouts, spring onions, generous sprigs of coriander and a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

    Each serving contains: 1310 kilojoules; 12 g protein; 8 g total fat (1 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 52 g total carbohydrates (9 g sugars, 8 g fibre); 453 mg sodium

    source: "Marvellous Miso", alive Australia #21, Spring 2014

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    Dragon Boat Rice Bowl with Miso Tofu Dressing

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