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Emerald Garlic Mashed Potatoes

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    Emerald Garlic Mashed Potatoes

    Consider leaving the peel on your potatoes as this significantly adds to the fibre you’ll receive. Adding garlic helps build the immune system at this critical time of year, and why not squeeze in some greens? When chopped finely and swirled into the potatoes, they are a real crowd pleaser. Saturated fat is removed entirely by using soy milk and olive oil instead of cream and butter.

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    6 cups (1.5 L) water
    4 large potatoes, cut into quarters
    4 cloves garlic, whole and peeled
    2 cups (500 mL) spinach, cut into thin strips
    1/3 to 1/2 cup (85 to 125 mL) unflavoured, enriched soy milk
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) extra-virgin olive oil
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) dried parsley
    Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

    Bring water to boil in large pot then add potatoes and garlic. Cook on medium-high for 15 minutes, until potatoes are tender.

    Pour 1/2 cup (125 mL) water into a second pot or frying pan, add spinach and steam for 5 minutes. Drain and transfer potatoes and garlic to large bowl. Add soy milk, olive oil, parsley, salt, and pepper, and mash well. Drain steamed spinach and stir evenly into potatoes.

    Serves 4.

    source: "Easy Traditional Elegance", alive #278, December 2005

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    Emerald Garlic Mashed Potatoes

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