banner
alive logo
foodfamilylifestylebeautysustainabilityhealthimmunity

Fresh Fruit Sorbet

    Share

    Fresh Fruit Sorbet

    The key to a great sorbet lies in the fruit; it must be ripe and prepared accordingly. For example, a melon sorbet requires peeled and seeded melon; strawberries should be washed and de-stemmed; blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries are usually good to go.

    Advertisement

    1 cup (250 mL) water
    1 cup (250 mL) sugar
    4 cups (1 L) ripe fruit
    2 Tbsp (30 mL) lemon juice

    Make a simple syrup by dissolving the sugar into boiling water; stir in lemon juice and desired fruit and remove from heat. Let sit for 5 minutes before pureing in blender or food processor. Freeze according to the directions on the ice cream maker.

    While it is possible to make a sorbet without an ice cream maker by taking the mixture out of the freezer every hour or so to manually break up the ice crystals, this is both time consuming and no guarantee of texture. An inexpensive machine ($40 and up) will make simple work of any sorbet.

    source: "SOBO's Sophisticated Bohemians", alive #304, February 2008

    Advertisement

    Fresh Fruit Sorbet

    Directions

    Advertisement
    Ad
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    READ THIS NEXT

    SEE MORE »
    Sweet and Sour Brussels Sprout Tempeh Stir-Fry

    Sweet and Sour Brussels Sprout Tempeh Stir-Fry

    This Asian-inspired stir-fry takes full advantage of the crunch Brussels sprouts achieve when they’re heated quickly. The sweet-and-sour sauce delivers a tangy edge, and tempeh offers plant-based protein and a blast of umami. If you want meat in the dish, you can replace tempeh with ground pork. Ready, set, go Stir-frying is a cooking method that thrives on speed. That means you want to have all of your ingredients prepped and ready to go into the pan. That also means no chopping on the fly.