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Nutty Sandwich Spreads

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    For a savoury sandwich spread

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    1 cup (250 ml) assorted nuts, finely ground
    1 tbsp (15 ml) Bragg all-purpose seasoning
    1 tbsp (15 ml) cold-pressed sunflower seed or pumpkin seed oil
    2 to 3 tbsp (30 to 45 ml) cold water (or more if paste is still too dry)
    1 tsp (5 ml) nutritional yeast
    herbal salt and thyme to season

    Mix all ingredients to a smooth paste and add fresh herbs such as parsley or fresh oregano. Try your own variety of herbs or spices. Top the sandwich with fresh cucumber slices or pickles.

    For a sweet sandwich spread

    1 cup (250 ml) assorted, finely ground nuts such as filberts, almonds, pistachios
    1/2 cup (125 ml) raisins
    1/4 cup (60 ml) orange juice
    1 tsp (5 ml) lemon juice
    1 tsp (5 ml) honey
    pinch of ground cloves, cinnamon, and coriander for seasoning

    In a food processor or blender, mix raisins, orange juice, lemon juice, and honey. Mix with ground nuts and season with spices. You may easily double or quadruple the recipe. This spread will keep in the fridge for days, because the honey serves as a preservative.

    source: "Brain Food",  alive #252, October 2003

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    Nutty Sandwich Spreads

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