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Roasted Cauliflower with Pecan Date Crumble

  • Servings4

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Cauliflower has been having a moment lately, and this salad proves exactly why. Tender caramelized cauliflower is crowned in a glorious sweet and savoury crumble that will ensure it a place on your table all month long. Of all tree nuts, pecans have the highest concentration of flavonoids, which offer beneficial anti-inflammatory effects, and they also protect your cells from oxidative damage.

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Crumble perfection

This crumble topping is too good not to use it on other preparations. Sprinkle over a carrot ribbon salad to add some extra pizzazz, use as a glorious garnish on a soup or stew, or consider generously spooning over your next vegetable “steak” to add some delicious textural variation.

 

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Roasted Cauliflower with Pecan Date Crumble

  • Servings4

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) raw pecans
  • 3 Tbsp (45 mL) raw pumpkin seeds
  • 1 large head cauliflower, about 2 1/2 lbs (just over 1 kg)
  • 4 Tbsp (60 mL) grapeseed oil or avocado oil, divided
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) ground black pepper
  • 1 large head of garlic
  • 4 Medjool dates, pitted
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) packed arugula leaves or kale leaves
  • 2 Tbsp (30 mL) raw hemp hearts
  • 1 lemon, finely zested and juiced

Nutrition

Per serving:

  • calories477
  • protein11 g
  • total fat 30 g
    • sat. fat3 g
  • total carbohydrates50 g
    • sugars32 g
    • fibre11 g
  • sodium359 mg

Directions

01

Preheat oven to 400 F (200 C).

02

On rimmed baking tray in preheated oven, place pecans and pumpkin seeds and toast, stirring once or twice, until pecans are fragrant and pumpkin seeds are toasted, 6 to 8 minutes. Let cool for 5 minutes.

03

Increase oven temperature to 425 F (218 C). Transfer cooled nuts to plate and place empty tray back in oven to preheat for 10 minutes.

04

Trim cauliflower and cut into florets. Transfer florets to large bowl along with 3 Tbsp (45 mL) oil, cumin, salt, and pepper and toss until well combined. Set aside.

05

Take garlic head and trim about 1/2 in (1.25 cm) off the top, exposing cloves within. Place on piece of parchment paper large enough to wrap garlic completely. Drizzle exposed garlic cloves with remaining 1 Tbsp (15 mL) oil. Bring parchment paper up and twist top to secure. Cover parchment-wrapped garlic bulb with foil in the same manner.

06

Tip seasoned cauliflower onto warmed baking tray and spread into even layer. Place wrapped garlic bulb on tray with cauliflower before roasting everything together, stirring once halfway, until cauliflower is caramelized and garlic cloves are soft, about 40 minutes.

07

While cauliflower is roasting, make crumble. On cutting board, place toasted pecans and pumpkin seeds with Medjool dates and roughly chop. Add arugula or kale, hemp hearts, and lemon zest and continue to chop until arugula is in bite-sized pieces and mixture is well combined but still has plenty of texture.

08

Transfer warm roasted cauliflower to serving platter. Squeeze garlic overtop cauliflower, tossing, if desired. Drizzle with lemon juice before sprinkling with crumble. Enjoy while warm or at room temperature.

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Going Pro

You might think of protein as something you mainly get from a meal and, therefore, not a component of dessert. But, if you’re going to opt for dessert from time to time, why not consider working in ingredients that go big on this important macronutrient? It’s easier (and more delicious) than you may think! Protein is an essential part of every cell in your body and plays a starring role in bone, muscle, and skin health. So, certainly, you want to make sure you’re eating enough. And it’s best to spread protein intake throughout the day, since your body needs a continual supply. This is why it can be a great idea to try to include protein in your desserts. When protein is provided in sufficient amounts in a dessert, it may help you feel more satiated and help temper blood sugar swings. Plus, in many cases, that protein comes in a package of other nutritional benefits. For instance, if you’re eating a dessert made with protein-packed Greek yogurt, you’re not just getting protein; you’re getting all the yogurt’s bone-benefitting calcium and immune-boosting probiotics, too. Adding nuts to your dessert doesn’t just provide plant-based protein, but it also provides heart-healthy fats. Yes, desserts need not be just empty calories. Ready for a treat? These protein-filled desserts with a healthy twist are dietitian-approved—and delicious.