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Spicy Broccoli Soup

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    Spicy Broccoli Soup

    The heat comes from a combination of curry powder, cracked black pepper, and cayenne.

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    2 Tbsp (30 mL) cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil
    2 organic onions, diced
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) curry powder
    3 cups (750 mL) low-sodium organic vegetable broth
    4 cloves organic garlic
    6 cups (1.5 L) chopped organic broccoli
    3/4 cup (180 mL) fat-free evaporated milk
    1/4 tsp (1 mL) cracked black pepper, not ground
    Pinch of cayenne pepper, or to taste

    In medium-sized pot over medium heat add oil and onion. Sauté until golden brown, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. Add curry powder and sauté for 30 seconds.

    Add vegetable broth and stir well.Add garlic and broccoli. Bring to a gentle boil.
    Reduce to simmer, cover, and continue simmering until vegetables are soft, about 15 to 20 minutes.

    Puree soup until smooth, using a handheld immersion blender, free-standing blender, or a food processor. Reheat, if necessary, and add milk. Season with both peppers. Serve immediately.

    Makes 6 - 1 cup (250 mL) servings.

    Nutrition information: Each 1 cup(250 mL) serving contains:114 calories; 5 g protein; 5.2 g total fat (0.8 g sat fat, 0 g trans fat);14 g carbohydrates; 3.4 g fibre;125 mg sodium

    source: "Little Green Giant", from alive #306, April 2008

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    Spicy Broccoli Soup

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