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Sprouted Quinoa Pilaf with Miso Dressing

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    Quinoa is also a complete protein, and when sprouted—as opposed to cooked—a 1/2 cup (125 mL) serving contains 21 percent of the recommended daily amount of iron and more potassium than a banana. It also contains large amounts of vitamin B6, thiamine, and riboflavin. More importantly, it’s slightly nutty and bitter, so it pairs well with umami-rich miso and sweet maple syrup, honey, or agave nectar.

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    1 cup (250 mL) sprouted quinoa
    1/2 cauliflower, grated (about 3 cups/750 mL)
    1/2 cup (125 mL) dried currants, cherries, or raisins
    1 cup (250 mL) chopped parsley
    1 stalk celery, diced
    5 green onions, thinly sliced (white and pale green parts only), divided
    3 Tbsp (45 mL) miso (any kind)
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar
    1 garlic clove, peeled
    Zest and juice of 1 lemon, about 1/4 cup (60 mL)
    2 tsp (10 mL) maple syrup, honey, or agave nectar
    1/4 tsp (1 mL) freshly ground black pepper
    2 tsp (10 mL) extra-virgin olive oil or sesame oil

    Combine sprouted quinoa, cauliflower, dried currants, parsley, celery, and 3 green onions in a large bowl.

    Blend remaining 2 green onions, miso, rice vinegar, garlic, lemon zest and juice, maple syrup, and black pepper in a blender or food processor. Add oil and blend again. Add to bowl and stir to combine.

    Serves 6 to 8.

    Each serving contains: 193 calories; 6 g protein; 4 g total fat (0 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 37 g total carbohydrates (15 g sugar, 6 g fibre); 355 mg sodium

    source: "Sprouting Out All Over", alive #359, September 2012

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    Sprouted Quinoa Pilaf with Miso Dressing

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