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Swiss Chard Rolls with Quinoa, Cranberry, and Sweet Potato

  • Servings7

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These Swiss chard bundles deliver scrumptious holiday flavours in nutritious fibre- and protein-packed parcels. Sweet potato, quinoa, and cranberries scented with thyme and rosemary make for a delicious and satisfying combination of flavours.

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Roll it up

Place Swiss chard leaves in large bowl. Fill kettle with water and bring it to the boil. Pour boiling water over leaves and allow them to soften for about 2 to 3 minutes. With tongs, remove leaves to plate. Lay leaf out on flat surface, face down. Remove the thickest part of central stem by making a notch at the bottom of the leaf and removing it. Overlap remaining loose ends. Place about a heaping tablespoon of filling near the bottom of the leaf and roll it up, tucking in the sides as you go. Place bundles seam side down in Dutch oven.

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Swiss Chard Rolls with Quinoa, Cranberry, and Sweet Potato

  • Servings7

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (250 mL) water
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) quinoa
  • 2 Tbsp (30 mL) extra-virgin olive oil (divided)
  • 1 sweet potato, diced
  • 4 to 5 thyme sprigs
  • 2 rosemary sprigs
  • 1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt, divided
  • 1/4 tsp (1 mL) pepper, divided
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) dried cranberries
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 28 oz (796 mL) can whole or crushed tomatoes
  • 1/4 tsp (1 mL) cinnamon
  • 14 Swiss chard leaves, thick part of stem removed and blanched (see tip)

Nutrition

Per serving:

  • calories150
  • protein5 g
  • total fat5 g
    • sat. fat1 g
  • total carbohydrates24 g
    • sugars7 g
    • fibre5 g
  • sodium307 mg

Directions

01

Preheat oven to 400 F (200 C).

02

In large pot, bring quinoa and water to boil. Reduce heat and cook, uncovered, for 10 minutes, until water has evaporated and each kernel forms a tail. Set aside to cool.

03

In bowl, combine 1 Tbsp (15 mL) olive oil, sweet potato, 2 to 3 thyme sprigs, 1 rosemary sprig, and half of each of the salt and pepper. Pour onto baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes. Allow to cool for about 5 minutes and scrape into bowl. Discard stems of herb sprigs, running your fingers along the sprig and adding leaves to bowl.

04

Chop leaves from remaining (uncooked) herb sprigs and add to bowl with sweet potato, quinoa, and cranberries.

05

In large Dutch oven, sauté onion in remaining 1 Tbsp (15 mL) olive oil on medium heat until soft. Add tomatoes and simmer on low until tomatoes are broken up. Season with cinnamon and remaining salt and pepper. If the sauce looks too thick, add a bit of water to loosen it.

06

Fill Swiss chard leaves with quinoa filling (see tip) and arrange the bundles in Dutch oven over tomato sauce. Cover with lid and simmer on medium-low on top of stove for 15 to 20 minutes. Allow to rest for 5 minutes, and then plate individually or serve buffet style directly from Dutch oven.

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