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Wild Mushroom Bisque

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    Wild Mushroom Bisque

    This light cream soup has a woodsy flavour and is excellent as a first course or as a light meal served with crusty rolls and a main course salad.

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    3 cups (750 mL) organic sodium-reduced chicken stock
    2 cups (500 mL) assorted dried mushrooms
    2 Tbsp (30 mL) organic extra-virgin olive oil
    1/2 cup (125 mL) shallots, minced
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) fresh rosemary, diced
    2 Tbsp (30 mL) organic whole wheat flour
    1/2 cup (125 mL) fat-free evaporated milk

    Heat chicken stock until boiling, remove from heat, and add dried mushrooms. Let soak for 20 minutes. Strain liquid into a bowl, reserving liquid. Coarsely chop mushrooms, and set aside.

    Heat a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add oil and shallots, saut for 3 to 5 minutes or until golden brown. Add reserved mushrooms and rosemary and saut for 1 to 2 minutes or until mushrooms start browning. Add flour to coat shallots and mushrooms. Pour in reserved chicken/mushroom stock. Bring to a boil, cover, and reduce heat to simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add milk, heat through, and serve.

    Makes 4 - 1 cup (250 ml) servings.

    Mushrooms have long been touted as immune enhancers. This soup does more than warm your soul; it also supports your immune system for flu season.

    Each serving contains: 149 calories; 4.7 g protein; 3.6 g total fat (1.1 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 18.2 g carbohydrates; 2.5 g fibre; 467 mg sodium.

    source: "Soul-Warming Soups", alive #313, November 2008

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    Wild Mushroom Bisque

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