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Winter Coleslaw

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    Filled with phytochemicals, this coleslaw will help cleanse your liver and protect you from cancer. Dillweed can be purchased in the produce section and freezes well for future use. The combination of dill, caraway and lemon adds a special tang. Use parsley if dill is not available.

    1/4 head purple cabbage
    1/4 head green cabbage
    2 carrots
    1 cup (250 ml) fresh dill weed

    Dressing:
    1 tsp (5 ml) dill seeds
    1 tsp (5 ml) caraway seeds
    Sea salt to taste
    1/2 cup (125 ml) lemon juice
    1 lemon, sliced for garnish

    Using a food processor, grate the cabbage and carrots. Mix together in a large bowl. Finely chop the dill and add to the bowl.

    For the dressing, grind the dill seed and caraway seeds coarsely, using a grinder or mortar and pestle. Blend salt, ground seeds and lemon juice in a jar. Toss salad with the dressing, chill and serve. Garnish with dill and lemon slices. Serves two to four.

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    Source: alive #243, January 2003

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    Winter Coleslaw

    Directions

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