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High protein intake increases bone density

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Some studies have concluded that older men and women who consume high amounts of protein often develop brittle bones, while other studies show that subjects who eat more protein have stronger bones.

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High protein intake increases bone density

Some studies have concluded that older men and women who consume high amounts of protein often develop brittle bones, while other studies show that subjects who eat more protein have stronger bones. Drs. Bess Dawson-Hughes and Susan Harris at TuftsUniversity shed some light on this heavily debated topic. Participants who consumed more protein over a three-year study showed higher bone densities, provided they consumed sufficient calcium and vitamin D. Protein from animal-, plant-, and dairy-based sources were all shown to be effective for maintaining bone density.

The clear message here is that if you want to continue to support healthy strong boneseat protein. Eat at least 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight if you’re sedentary and 1.8 g/k of body weight if you weight train. Make sure you consume enough calcium (1.2 grams per day) and vitamin D (400 IU per day).

A happy heart is a healthy heart

Replace negative thinking with positive, happy thoughts and feelings and your heart will thank you.

Researchers have found that negative emotions, such as depression, anxiety, pessimism, and hostility, have been associated with the development of coronary heart disease and heart attacks. Negative emotions may affect heart rate variability or promote inflammatory proteins tied to heart disease. Destructive stress hormones are also linked to a negative outlook on life. Conversely, the researchers saw evidence that a positive change of heart yielded heart-healing effects.

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