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Fire Roasted Sweet Potatoes

Serves 6

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    Fire Roasted Sweet Potatoes

    You might want to make a couple extra of these. As sweet potatoes cook, their sugars caramelize and ooze through the skins, combining with the smokiness of the fire for a completely addictive side dish.

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    "As sweet potatoes cook, their sugars caramelize and ooze through the skins, combining with the smokiness of the fire for a completely addictive side dish."

    Safety Tips

    Keep it clean To keep things hygienic, Raymond has a large pot of water boiling on the fire constantly. “It’s great for tea or hot cocoa at night, but also to do the dishes or wash the kids. And whenever we add new water, we wait 10 minutes for it to be sanitized.”

    Prep in advance You can chop vegetables and meat in advance at home and store them in separate lightweight containers or leak-proof bags in the cooler to reduce cleanup and cross-contamination.

    Stay food safe Pack biodegradable soap and make sure that no bowls, cutting boards or knives are left around after touching meat or seafood.

    Use some frozen multitaskers Frozen peas are the perfect paella addition because they can replace some of the ice in your cooler and will thaw by dinnertime. But make sure there’s still enough ice on top of the shrimp and mussels to keep them safely chilled. While some might be uneasy bringing seafood in a cooler, Raymond says with enough ice you’ll be fine. “As long as everything is in the cooler until you need it, I’m not worried.”

    Pack a shovel! And the most important tip, especially with kids who tend to play around the fire: always keep a shovel nearby, just in case.

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    Fire Roasted Sweet Potatoes

    Ingredients

    • 6 sweet potatoes
    • 1 Tbsp (15 mL) extra-virgin olive oil

    Nutrition

    Per serving:

    • calories135
    • protein2g
    • fat3g
      • saturated fat0g
      • trans fat0g
    • carbohydrates27g
      • sugars9g
      • fibre4g
    • sodium41mg

    Directions

    01

    Coat each sweet potato in oil, and place on grill grate over a medium flame for about 30 to 40 minutes, depending on the intensity of the heat. Rotate potatoes occasionally for even cooking.

    Test with a fork. Sweet potato should be softened and oozing caramel.

    Season with salt and pepper to taste, or dip in the juices from Fish and Asparagus en Papillote.

    Tip

    "You don’t need to use oil to cook the sweet potatoes, but it adds flavour,” says Raymond; it acts as a vehicle for the smokiness.

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