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Curried Beans and Potato with Chickpeas

Serves 6

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    Feeling like your favourite Indian takeout tonight? This plant-based curried bean and potato dish is an easy, delicious take on a classic Indian specialty. This version is made with a warm, mild traditional Indian curry, but can be made spicier with a green, yellow, or red Thai curry, if preferred.

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    Veg it up!

    Try adding or swapping different vegetables for additional variety, colour, and nutritional content, such as sweet potatoes, squash, carrots, or cannellini beans.

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    Curried Beans and Potato with Chickpeas

      Ingredients

      • 1 Tbsp (15 mL) extra-virgin olive oil
      • 2 large yellow onions, thinly sliced in half moons
      • 2 tsp (10 mL) ground turmeric
      • 2 tsp (10 mL) ground cumin
      • 1/4 tsp (1 mL) cayenne
      • 1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt
      • 4 cups (1 L) diced peeled russet potatoes
      • 4 cups (1 L) green beans cut into 1 1/2 in (3.75 cm) pieces
      • 2 cups (500 mL) canned chickpeas, rinsed and drained
      • 3 cups (750 mL) low-sodium vegetable stock

      Nutrition

      Per serving:

      • calories351
      • protein16 g
      • total fat7 g
        • sat. fat1 g
      • total carbohydrates60 g
        • sugars11 g
        • fibre17 g
      • sodium318 mg

      Directions

      01

      In large pot, heat olive oil on medium heat, add onions and cook down until caramelized, approximately 30 minutes. Add spices, stir, and let heat for 30 seconds. Add potatoes, beans, chickpeas, and stock. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer for 20 minutes, or until potatoes are fork tender.

      02

      Serve in bowls alongside naan, if desired.

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