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Ginger Beer Green Tea

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    Green tea is the unfermented leaf of the Camellia sinensis plant. The leaves are dried right after picking and researchers believe that it has more powerful antioxidant activity because it is less processed (fermented) than black tea. The American Journal of Cardiology reported in 2002 that participants in a Japanese study who drank at least one cup of green tea per day were 42 percent less likely to suffer heart attacks than those who did not. Heart disease is less common in Japan than in the West, and heavy consumption of green tea may explain why.

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    Experts recommend you brew green tea in a pot that allows expansion of the leaves, use hot water that is just below boiling temperature, and steep the tea for two minutes.

    You’ll find the natural ginger beer called for in this recipe at health food stores and organic grocers.

    2 cups (500 mL) brewed green tea, chilled
    2 cups (500 mL) natural ginger beer
    Fresh mint leaves or lemon slices

    Pour 1 cup (250 mL) cold green tea and 1 cup (250 mL) ginger beer into each of two tall glasses. Garnish with mint and lemon zest or lemon slices. Serves 2.

    source: "Longevi-tea", alive #271, May 2005

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    Ginger Beer Green Tea

    Directions

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