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Quark and Leek Harvest Pudding in a Squash Bowl

Serves 4.

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    Serve this as a vegetarian main or side dish with whole grain bread and a leafy salad. Tap into the pudding; the Parmesan layer cracks like a crème brûlée, giving way to the supple, velvety bounty within. If serving this to a crowd—prepare yourself. Your guests will look at you differently and revere your very presence from this day forward.

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    To wow your dinner guests, use a handheld blowtorch, tableside, to brown the cheese topping.

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    Quark and Leek Harvest Pudding in a Squash Bowl

    Ingredients

    • 2 small Hubbard squash or acorn squash, halved, cleaned, hulled, and seeded
    • 1 Tbsp (15 mL) extra-virgin olive oil or coconut oil
    • 1/2 medium-large leek, split lengthwise, washed thoroughly, and sliced thinly crosswise
    • 1/4 small yellow onion, finely chopped
    • Pink Himalayan salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
    • 1 to 2 tsp (5 to 10 mL) minced fresh tarragon or 1/2 to 1 tsp (2 to 5 mL) dried tarragon
    • 1 Tbsp (15 mL) finely minced fresh flat-leaf parsley
    • 3 large organic eggs
    • 2/3 cup (160 mL) quark
    • 2 Tbsp (30 mL) plain yogurt or labneh
    • 4 Tbsp (60 mL) grated Parmesan cheese, for topping

    Nutrition

    Per serving:

    • calories268
    • protein16g
    • fat11g
      • saturated fat6g
      • trans fat0g
    • carbohydrates32g
      • sugars7g
      • fibre6g
    • sodium213mg

    Directions

    01

    Preheat oven to 350 F (180 C).

    02

    Cut thin slice off bottom round of squash halves to stabilize u201cbowls.u201d Place a bit of water in each squash bowl to determine if each is level, as pudding will set crooked if bottom is cut crooked; empty and pat dry.

    03

    Heat oil over medium heat; add leeks and onion, seasoning with pinch of salt and pepper. Sauteu0301 for 7 to 10 minutes, or until soft (do not brown). Cool, add tarragon and parsley, and blend until fine (do not pureu0301e).

    04

    In medium bowl, whisk eggs until pale and thick. Whisk in quark and yogurt or labneh until velvety smooth. Gently fold in leek and onion mixture until completely combined; season with salt and pepper to taste. Scoop out a little more squash, if needed, to accommodate filling. Chop and save for another recipe.

    05

    Divide pudding mixture among squash halves. Place in middle rack of preheated oven.

    06

    Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, until centre jiggles slightly. Place on cooling rack. Sprinkle 1 Tbsp (15 mL) Parmesan over each pudding. Place in top oven rack under broiler until cheese is melted and bubbly (about 75 to 90 secondsu2014watch closely).

    07

    Serve immediately.

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    This recipe is part of the Cheese Making at Home collection.

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    Going Pro
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    Going Pro

    You might think of protein as something you mainly get from a meal and, therefore, not a component of dessert. But, if you’re going to opt for dessert from time to time, why not consider working in ingredients that go big on this important macronutrient? It’s easier (and more delicious) than you may think! Protein is an essential part of every cell in your body and plays a starring role in bone, muscle, and skin health. So, certainly, you want to make sure you’re eating enough. And it’s best to spread protein intake throughout the day, since your body needs a continual supply. This is why it can be a great idea to try to include protein in your desserts. When protein is provided in sufficient amounts in a dessert, it may help you feel more satiated and help temper blood sugar swings. Plus, in many cases, that protein comes in a package of other nutritional benefits. For instance, if you’re eating a dessert made with protein-packed Greek yogurt, you’re not just getting protein; you’re getting all the yogurt’s bone-benefitting calcium and immune-boosting probiotics, too. Adding nuts to your dessert doesn’t just provide plant-based protein, but it also provides heart-healthy fats. Yes, desserts need not be just empty calories. Ready for a treat? These protein-filled desserts with a healthy twist are dietitian-approved—and delicious.