banner
alive logo
FoodFamilyLifestyleBeautySustainabilityHealthImmunity

Scallops with Cauliflower Mustard Purée

    Share

    Serves 4

    Advertisement

    Here’s a meal worthy of a fine dining establishment. Grainy mustard is a whole seed laced version of the condiment and is also often labelled “Dijon”. It comes in a range of heat levels from mild to nose-clearing. It adds texture and verve to mashed and puréed vegetables. Removing as much moisture as possible from scallops is the key to achieving a good sear.

    1 head cauliflower
    1/2 cup (125 ml) milk
    2 Tbsp (40 ml) white wine
    1 Tbsp (20 ml) grainy mustard
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1 shallot, minced
    2 tsp (10 ml) fresh thyme
    1 tsp (5 ml) fennel seeds
    1 tsp (5 ml) lemon zest
    1/4 tsp (2 ml) sea salt
    1 cup (250 ml) shelled frozen edamame
    1 lb (450 g) sea scallops
    3 tsp (15 ml) grapeseed or extra-virgin olive oil
    1 1/2 Tbsp (30 ml) chopped chives

    Place florets of cauliflower in steamer basket and steam until tender, about 8 minutes.

    Transfer cauliflower to food processor container along with milk, wine, mustard, garlic, shallot, thyme, fennel seeds, lemon zest and salt. Blend until smooth and set aside.

    Prepare edamame according to package directions.

    Rinse scallops with cold water and pat dry with paper towel. Season with salt and pepper. Heat oil in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Place scallops in pan and allow them to cook undisturbed until browned and crisp on one side, about 2 minutes. Gently flip scallops and sear for another 2 minutes.

    Spread equal amounts of cauliflower purée on serving plates and top with scallops, edamame and chives.

    Each serving contains: 1222 kilojoules; 32 g protein; 9 g total fat (2 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 19 g total carbohydrates (6 g sugars, 7 g fibre); 520 mg sodium

    source: "Cooking With Mustard", alive Australia #16, Winter 2013

    Advertisement

    Scallops with Cauliflower Mustard Purée

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    READ THIS NEXT

    SEE MORE »
    Going Pro
    Food

    Going Pro

    You might think of protein as something you mainly get from a meal and, therefore, not a component of dessert. But, if you’re going to opt for dessert from time to time, why not consider working in ingredients that go big on this important macronutrient? It’s easier (and more delicious) than you may think! Protein is an essential part of every cell in your body and plays a starring role in bone, muscle, and skin health. So, certainly, you want to make sure you’re eating enough. And it’s best to spread protein intake throughout the day, since your body needs a continual supply. This is why it can be a great idea to try to include protein in your desserts. When protein is provided in sufficient amounts in a dessert, it may help you feel more satiated and help temper blood sugar swings. Plus, in many cases, that protein comes in a package of other nutritional benefits. For instance, if you’re eating a dessert made with protein-packed Greek yogurt, you’re not just getting protein; you’re getting all the yogurt’s bone-benefitting calcium and immune-boosting probiotics, too. Adding nuts to your dessert doesn’t just provide plant-based protein, but it also provides heart-healthy fats. Yes, desserts need not be just empty calories. Ready for a treat? These protein-filled desserts with a healthy twist are dietitian-approved—and delicious.