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Swiss Chard Egg Skillet

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    Swiss Chard Egg Skillet

    This dish is just as good for a lazy weekend brunch as it is to serve as part of a workday dinner. The pile of sautéed vegetables makes a perfect bed for the delicately cooked eggs. Excellent garnish options include grated Parmesan, smoked salt, hot sauce, or smoked paprika.

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    1 large bunch Swiss chard or rainbow chard
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) grapeseed or extra-virgin olive oil
    1 medium-sized yellow onion, chopped
    2 cups (500 mL) sliced mushrooms 
    3 garlic cloves, minced
    2 cups (500 mL) grated rutabaga
    1 Tbsp (15 mL) fresh thyme
    1/4 tsp (1 mL) sea salt
    1/4 tsp (1 mL) freshly ground black pepper
    4 large free-range eggs

    Remove chard leaves from stems. Chop stems and leaves. Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add chard stems and onion; cook for 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and garlic and cook 3 minutes. Stir in grated rutabaga and chard leaves, in batches if necessary, along with thyme, salt, and pepper. Cook until chard leaves have wilted.

    Make 4 small nests in vegetable mixture. Crack 1 egg into each nest. Cover skillet, reduce heat slightly, and cook until whites are set but yolks are still runny, about 4 minutes. Being careful not to break the egg yolks, transfer the vegetables and eggs to serving plates and garnish as you like.

    Serves 4.

    Each serving contains: 180 calories; 10 g protein; 9 g total fat (2 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 17 g total carbohydrates (10 g sugars, 4 g fibre); 392 mg sodium 

    source: "One-skillet Meals", alive #378, April 2014

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    Swiss Chard Egg Skillet

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