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A Mother’s Day Meal in the Garden

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Mother’s Day is a time to celebrate the leading women in our lives. And if you’re a mother, that means you, too! Taking a break while unwinding with mom-friends over a community meal offers much-needed stress relief from the demands of family and everyday living (even if they’re welcome ones!), while nourishing important female friendships.

There’s really no better way to step back from the whirlwind nature of our lives than a ladies-only garden party, cooked by you and your village. Because this day is all about you, moms, the workload is light and shared.

These healthy meals are beautiful, transportable, and so simple to prepare. Enjoyed outside in the garden, park, or, if it’s rainy, amongst some flower arrangements indoors, this straightforward yet stunning feast was designed to nurture those who nurture everyone else.

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Pink Devilled Eggs

Herbed Chicken and Carrot Patty Lettuce Cups

Easy to transport and eat, these juicy chicken parcels are reminiscent of a fresh spring roll, thanks to herbs, carrot, and fish sauce.

Melon and Halloumi with Chili Crisp and Lime

Slice, drizzle, and squeeze—there’s little more to this refreshing, flavour-packed sweet-meets-heat melon salad.

Spiced Cauliflower Dip with Rainbow Crudités

Roasted cauliflower gets snacky in this luxurious, plant-based cauliflower dip. You can make the dip and store sliced veggies submerged in water for a couple of days ahead of the potluck.

Spring Mix Panzanella

Panzanella is an Italian bread salad that’s typically made with summer tomatoes. Mom’s version is simplified with a spring green update.

Berry and Yogurt Slab Tart

One giant berry-and-oat crumb bar, jooshed up with rich vanilla yogurt. There’s no rolling of pastry here, making this minimalist dessert a cinch to whip up.

Eco-conscious dishware and table-settings

Keep waste to a bare minimum and work toward a fully reusable garden party with these chic options:

  • bamboo fibre dishes, utensils, and tumblers
  • wheat straw plates and tumblers
  • glass and stainless steel food transportation and storage containers
  • Mason jars for drinking cups, flower vases, and candle holders
  • natural fibre linens for napkins and tablecloths (bonus if they’re second-hand!)
  • soy or beeswax candles
  • wildflowers native to your area for Mason jar vases

Spring spritzers

Try these simple, bubbly nonalcoholic drinks for your Mother’s Day menu.

Mellow Mojito

In large pitcher, muddle 20 fresh mint leaves with 2 sliced limes and 2 Tbsp (15 mL) agave or maple syrup. Top with 3 to 4 cups (750 mL to 1 L) cold soda water, stir well to chill, and pour into glasses. Garnish cups with more fresh mint and a lime wedge.

Cherry-Coconut Spritzer

Add ice cubes to individual glasses followed by a big pour of pure cherry juice and squeeze of lemon. Top with cold coconut water and a splash of cold soda water. Garnish cups with a fresh cherry and lemon wedge.

Blackberry Kombucha Spritzer

In glasses, muddle a couple of fresh blackberries to release their juices, and then top with your favourite flavour of cold kombucha.

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