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Beet Pancakes with Cherry Sauce

Beet Pancakes with Cherry Sauce

Not to worry, these swoon-worthy pancakes don’t taste beety despite including the root vegetable for its red touch. The batter can be prepared up to two days in advance and kept chilled in the refrigerator. But it’s best used at room temperature. Thin with additional milk or yogurt if the batter becomes too thick. Makes about 14 pancakes. 1 medium-sized beet, peeled and chopped 1 1/4 cups (310 mL) gluten-free oat flour 1 tsp (5 mL) cinnamon, divided 1 1/2 tsp (7 mL) baking powder 1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt 1 cup (250 mL) milk 1/2 cup (125 mL) plain yogurt 1 medium banana 1 large free-range egg 1/3 cup (80 mL) chopped walnuts (optional) 1 Tbsp (15 mL) unsalted butter 2 cups (500 mL) frozen pitted cherries 3 Tbsp (45 mL) pure maple syrup 1 tsp (5 mL) lemon zest 1 1/2 tsp (7 mL) cornstarch, dissolved in 1 Tbsp (15 mL) water 1 tsp (5 mL) vanilla extract Place beet in steamer basket set over at least 1 in (2.5 cm) of water and steam until tender. Set aside to cool. In large bowl, stir together oat flour, 3/4 tsp (4 mL) cinnamon, baking powder, and salt. Place beet, milk, yogurt, and banana in blender container and blend until smooth. Blend in egg. Add beet mixture to dry ingredients and gently combine. Fold in walnuts if using. Let batter rest for 10 minutes. Heat skillet over medium heat. Add butter to skillet and melt. Pour 1/4 cup (60 mL) batter for each pancake into pan and cook for 2 minutes, or until darkened around the edges and bubbles form on the surface. Flip and cook for 2 minutes more. Test a pancake to see if it has cooked through. If not, increase cooking time. Transfer cooked pancakes to baking sheet and keep warm in preheated 200 F (95 C) oven as you prepare remaining pancakes. To make cherry sauce, bring cherries, maple syrup, lemon zest, remaining cinnamon, and 1/4 cup (60 mL) water to a simmer in medium-sized saucepan. Simmer for 10 minutes and then gently mash cherries into a pulpy purée. Stir dissolved cornstarch and vanilla extract into cherry mixture and simmer for 2 minutes more, or until slightly thickened. Serve pancakes topped with cherry sauce. Serves 4. Each serving contains: 402 calories; 14 g protein; 13 g total fat (3 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 60 g total carbohydrates (27 g sugars, 6 g fibre); 236 mg sodium source: " A Red Inspired Menu ", alive #388, February 2015

Traditional Buckwheat Crêpes

Traditional Buckwheat Crêpes

This recipe reminds me of my childhood. My mother did all the cooking, but my father would always prepare the buckwheat crêpes, called galettes de sarrasin in French. The galette can be eaten on its own, with a drizzle of molasses or with your favourite filling. I like to add chopped tomatoes, a sprinkle of cheese, and fresh herbs, and savour this as a breakfast or light lunch. 2 cups (500 mL) organic buckwheat flour 2 large eggs, beaten 3 cups (750 mL) water 1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt 1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda 1 Tbsp (15 mL) unsalted butter, or more as needed Molasses, for topping (optional) In large bowl, mix flour, eggs, water, salt, and baking soda with whisk until well combined. Set aside to rest for about 30 minutes. Heat 10 to 12 in (25 to 30 cm) cast iron pan over medium heat until hot. Lightly butter pan, stir crêpe batter, and pour 1/2 cup (125 mL) into pan. Spread slightly with back of a wooden spoon. Cook for 2 minutes, or until bubbles appear all over surface, flip, and cook for additional 30 seconds, or until golden. Set aside and repeat until all crêpes are made, adding butter to pan if necessary. Eat with a drizzle of molasses, Acorn Squash Fillingor your favourite filling. Another suggestion is to break an egg in the middle of the crêpe after you flip it. Once egg is cooked to satisfaction, fold crêpe edges toward centre, leaving yolk and part of the whites exposed. Serves 8. Each serving contains: 113 calories; 4 g protein; 2 g total fat (1 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 21 g total carbohydrates (1 g sugars, 2 g fibre); 312 mg sodium How to cook the perfect crêpe Ideally, use a well-seasoned cast iron pan. A well-seasoned cast iron pan will provide you with an almost nonstick surface. Rummage through yard and garage sales and see what you can discover. Preheat pan over medium heat and then pour in batter. Using back of a wooden spoon or heat-resistant rubber spatula, spread batter a little. Once bubbles form over the surface of the crêpe, flip and cook until just golden. Keep crêpes warm in oven while preparing new ones and serve as soon as they are all done. source: " Introducing Buckwheat Flour ", alive #387, January 2015

Acorn Squash Filling

Acorn Squash Filling

You can replace the acorn squash with butternut squash if you prefer. I like this filling for its vibrant colours and pleasing textures—and delicious taste! 1/4 cup (60 mL) extra-virgin olive oil, divided 3 acorn squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2 in (1.25 cm) cubes 6 small shallots, peeled and halved 2 cups (500 mL) mushrooms, quartered and stem removed 1 Tbsp (15 mL) fresh thyme 1 Tbsp (15 mL) chopped fresh sage 1/2 cup (125 mL) walnut pieces, lightly toasted 2 cups (500 mL) spinach leaves 1/4 lb (125 g) Gruyère cheese, coarsely grated Preheat oven to 400 F (200 C). Pour 2 Tbsp (30 mL) olive oil in roasting pan or baking sheet and stir in squash and shallots until well coated. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until vegetables are tender, but still keep their shape. Remove from oven. Meanwhile, heat remaining oil in frying pan over medium-high heat and sauté mushrooms until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Stir in thyme, sage, and walnuts and cook a further 3 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in squash, shallots, any pan juices, spinach, and Gruyère until well combined. Set aside. Once crêpes have been prepared, divide among 8 plates and divide filling among all crêpes. Fold crêpes and serve immediately. Makes 4 cups (1 L). Each 1/2 cup (125 mL) serving contains: 252 calories; 8 g protein; 16 g total fat (4 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 22 g total carbohydrates (1 g sugars, 4 g fibre); 62 mg sodium source: " Introducing Buckwheat Flour ", alive #387, January 2015

Almond Blueberry Pancake Mix / Orange Licorice Rooibos Tea Mix / Mayan Hot Chocolate Mix / Za'atar Spice Mix

Almond Blueberry Pancake Mix / Orange Licorice Rooibos Tea Mix / Mayan Hot Chocolate Mix / Za'atar Spice Mix

Almond Blueberry Pancake Mix Place 4 cups (1 L) organic whole wheat pastry flour, oat flour, or whole spelt flour, 2 cups (500 mL) almond flour, 1 cup (250 mL) dried blueberries, 2 Tbsp (30 mL) cinnamon, 2 Tbsp (30 mL) baking powder, 1 Tbsp (15 mL) baking soda, and 1 1/2 tsp (7 mL) salt in mixing bowl and use whisk to distribute ingredients evenly. Divide among gift jars. Instructions: Place 1 cup (250 mL) pancake mix in mixing bowl. In separate bowl, stir together 1 beaten egg and 1 cup (250 mL) milk. Stir wet ingredients into dry and let rest for 10 minutes. Pour 1/4 cup (60 mL) batter for each pancake (makes 8 pancakes). Orange Licorice Rooibos Tea Mix Using vegetable peeler, remove rind from 2 oranges. Place orange rinds on parchment-lined baking sheet and bake at your oven’s lowest temperature for 3 to 4 hours, or until rinds have dried completely and curled. Turn off oven and let cool in oven. Pulverize orange rind in spice grinder or mortar and pestle. Stir together orange powder, 2 oz (56 g) plain rooibos tea and 1 oz (28 g) licorice root. Divide tea mixture among small glass containers. Instructions: Place a heaping tablespoonful of tea mix in tea strainer and add steaming water; steep for 3 to 4 minutes. Mayan Hot Chocolate Mix Finely chop 6 oz (170 g) dark chocolate and mix with 1 cup (250 mL) cocoa powder, 2/3 cup (160 mL) coconut sugar, 1/3 cup (80 mL) powdered milk or powdered coconut milk, 1 tsp (5 mL) cinnamon, 1/4 tsp (1 mL) cayenne or chili powder, and 1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt. Pour into airtight jars. Instructions: Mix 2 to 3 Tbsp (30 to 45 mL) cocoa mixture with 1 cup (250 mL) milk of choice and warm in a saucepan. Za’atar Spice Mix Mix together 1/2 cup (125 mL) dried thyme, 1/4 cup (60 mL) crushed sumac, 1/4 cup (60 mL) toasted sesame seeds, and 1 tsp (10 mL) sea salt. Divide among gift jars. Instructions: Use in dips; blend into pasta salads; rub on fish or chicken; or sprinkle on roasted vegetables (such as winter squash, potatoes, eggplant, mushrooms), pizza, toasted pitas, scrambled eggs, and popcorn. source: " Love Bites ", alive #386, December 2014

Maple Hazelnut Granola

Maple Hazelnut Granola

Who doesn’t love receiving from-scratch granola? Dried cherries, hazelnuts, and cacao nibs give this version a luxurious appeal and show recipients you truly care about helping them start the day in a healthy way. 3 cups (750 mL) rolled oats 1/2 cup (125 mL) walnuts, coarsely chopped 1/3 cup (80 mL) hemp hearts 1/2 tsp (2 mL) kosher salt 1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon 1/2 tsp (2 mL) ground cardamom 1/2 cup (125 mL) pure maple syrup, preferably dark grade 1/2 cup (125 mL) coconut oil, melted 2 tsp (10 mL) vanilla extract 3/4 cup (180 mL) unsweetened coconut flakes 1/2 cup (125 mL) hazelnuts, halved 3/4 cup (180 mL) dried cherries or dried cranberries 1/4 cup (60 mL) cacao nibs Preheat oven to 325 F (160 C). In large bowl, toss together oats, walnuts, hemp hearts, salt, cinnamon, and cardamom. In separate bowl, stir together maple syrup, coconut oil, and vanilla. Add maple syrup mixture to oats and stir until everything is moist. Turn mixture out onto parchment paper-lined baking sheet and spread out into an even layer. Bake for 15 minutes; remove pan from oven and stir in coconut flakes and hazelnuts. Return to oven and bake until granola is fragrant and golden, 18 to 20 minutes, stirring once halfway through. Be careful that the oats don’t burn. Stir in dried cherries and cacao nibs. Let cool completely and then divide among wide-mouth jars. Makes enough for 3 to 4 gifts. Each 1/2 cup (125 mL) serving contains: 384 calories; 6 g protein; 17 g total fat (13 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 35 g total carbohydrates (13 g sugars, 8 g fibre); 103 mg sodium source: " Love Bites ", alive #386, December 2014

Mediterranean Farro Frittata

Mediterranean Farro Frittata

This frittata keeps your palate guessing with plenty of flavour and textural contrasts. Farro is an ancient grain with Mediterranean roots and a wonderful chewy texture. However, you could also use spelt or wheat berries. Traditionally made from sheeps’ milk and goats’ milk, halloumi is a firm and salty cheese originally hailing from Cyprus. If unavailable, feta can be substituted. 1/2 cup (125 mL) farro 1 Tbsp (15 mL) grapeseed oil 1 medium red bell pepper, thinly sliced 2 shallots, thinly sliced 4 cups (1 L) baby spinach 8 large free-range eggs 1/3 cup (80 mL) milk or unflavoured rice milk 1/3 cup (80 mL) sliced marinated artichoke hearts 1/4 cup (60 mL) chopped kalamata olives 4 oz (125 g) halloumi or feta cheese, chopped 4 to 6 anchovies, rinsed and chopped (optional) 2 Tbsp (30 mL) chopped oregano 1 tsp (5 mL) sweet smoked paprika Bring 2 cups (500 mL) water to boil in medium-sized saucepan. Add farro and simmer until tender but not mushy, about 25 minutes. Drain any excess water. Preheat oven to 400 F (200 C). Heat oil in 10 in (25 cm) ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add red pepper and shallots; heat until pepper has softened. Stir in spinach and heat just until slightly wilted. Meanwhile, whisk together eggs and milk. Stir in farro, artichoke hearts, olives, cheese, anchovies if using, oregano, and smoked paprika. Carefully pour egg mixture into skillet and cook for 3 minutes, without stirring. Transfer skillet to oven and bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until knife inserted into centre leaves a clean cut into eggs and liquid does not fill cut. Use heatproof spatula to loosen frittata from skillet. Slice into wedges and serve. Serves 4. Each serving contains: 301 calories; 17 g protein; 18 g total fat (7 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 18 g total carbohydrates (5 g sugars, 3 g fibre); 466 mg sodium source: " 30-Minute Meals ", alive #384, October 2014

Chicken Pesto Frittata

Chicken Pesto Frittata

Packed with chicken, mozzarella, tomatoes and pesto, this frittata has a definite pizza vibe. You’ll have extra pesto, so use it in pasta dishes, as a sandwich spread, or even as a garnish for creamy soups. The arugula pesto can be made up to three days in advance. 2 cups (500 mL) arugula 1/2 cup (125 mL) fresh basil 1/3 cup (80 mL) walnuts 3 garlic cloves, chopped 1/3 cup (80 mL) grated low-sodium Parmesan cheese Juice of 1/2 lemon 1/4 cup (60 mL) extra-virgin olive oil or camelina oil 1 Tbsp (15 mL) grapeseed oil 1 lb (450 g) skinless, boneless chicken thighs, cut into 1 in (2.5 cm) pieces 2 shallots, thinly sliced 8 large free-range eggs 1/3 cup (80 mL) milk or unflavoured rice milk 1 cup (250 mL) shredded mozzarella cheese, divided 1/2 cup (125 mL) oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, sliced To create pesto, pulse together arugula, basil, walnuts, and garlic in food processor or blender until coarsely minced. Pulse in Parmesan and lemon juice. With food processor running, pour olive oil in through feed tube until incorporated. Preheat oven to 400 F (200 C). Heat grapeseed oil in 10 in (25cm) ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add chicken to pan and heat until just cooked through, about 5 minutes. Stir in shallots and heat for 2 minutes. Whisk together eggs, milk, 1/2 cup (125 mL) mozzarella, tomatoes, and 1/3 cup (80 mL) pesto. Carefully pour egg mixture into skillet without displacing pan’s contents. Scatter remaining cheese over top and cook for 3 minutes, without stirring. Transfer skillet to oven and bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until knife inserted into centre leaves a clean cut into eggs and liquid does not fill cut. Use heatproof spatula to loosen frittata from skillet and slice into wedges to serve. Serves 6. Each serving contains: 388 calories; 33 g protein; 26 g total fat (7 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 6 g total carbohydrates (2 g sugars, 1 g fibre); 303 mg sodium source: " 30-Minute Meals ", alive #384, October 2014

Apple Cheddar Rosemary Pie

Apple Cheddar Rosemary Pie

This riff on apple pie has a definite sweet and savoury personality—a slice can hit the spot for brunch or can be served alongside a salad for lunch. If you want a little added crunch, consider tossing some chopped walnuts into the apple mixture. 2 1/2 lb (1.25 kg) tart apples, chopped into 1/2 in (1.25 cm) pieces 1/4 cup (60 mL) organic coconut sugar or other raw-style sugar 2 Tbsp (30 mL) spelt or almond flour 1 Tbsp (15 mL) chopped rosemary 1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt Prepared spelt pie dough (see recipe here ) 1 cup (250 mL) shredded low-sodium sharp cheddar cheese 1 large free-range egg, beaten Preheat oven to 350 F (180 C) and set rack in bottom third of oven. In large bowl, toss together apples, sugar, flour, rosemary, and salt. Roll 1 portion of prepared spelt pie dough between 2 sheets of parchment paper into roughly a 12 in (30 cm) circle. Peel off top sheet and invert dough into lightly greased 9 in (23 cm) pie pan. Peel off remaining paper. If needed, trim crust with kitchen shears so it overhangs the edge of pan by about 1 in (2.5 cm). Pour apple mixture into pie shell and sprinkle cheese over top. Roll remaining portion of dough between sheets of parchment paper into a circle slightly smaller than bottom round. Peel off top sheet and invert dough onto apple mixture. Peel off remaining paper. If needed, trim top crust so it overhangs evenly. Tuck top crust under bottom crust, sealing them together and making a plump edge. Use both hands to pinch (flute) edge of crust by pushing the thumb of one hand in between the thumb and index finger of the opposite. Brush top and edge with egg, and use paring knife to slice 6 steam vents in top crust. Bake pie for 45 to 50 minutes, or until top is golden brown. Let cool for about 30 minutes before slicing. Serves 8. Each serving contains: 441 calories; 10 g protein; 22 g total fat (13 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 51 g total carbohydrates (24 g sugars, 7 g fibre); 235 mg sodium Apple a day Noshing on apples regularly can lower levels of oxidized LDL (bad) cholesterol. source: " Life of Pi(e) ", alive #383, September 2014

Zucchini Ricotta Pancakes

Zucchini Ricotta Pancakes

As with zucchini bread, shredded zucchini can add a nutritional boost to pancakes. Folding in whipped egg whites produces truly fluffy pancakes that are brightened with lemon essence. The batter can be prepared the night before, but it’s best to leave it out at room temperature for about one hour before using. Top with berries and maple syrup. 2 cups (500 mL) grated zucchini 1 cup (250 mL) ricotta cheese 4 large free-range eggs, separated 2 Tbsp (30 mL) coconut sugar or other raw style sugar Zest of 1 lemon Juice of 1/2 lemon 1 cup (250 mL) organic oat flour 1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon 1/2 tsp (2 mL) baking powder 1/2 tsp (2 mL) baking soda 1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt 1 Tbsp (15 mL) unsalted butter or coconut oil Place zucchini in colander, sprinkle with salt, and let rest while you prepare batter. In large mixing bowl, stir together ricotta cheese, egg yolks, sugar, lemon zest, and lemon juice. In separate bowl, stir together flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Gently stir flour mixture into cheese mixture. Beat egg whites with electric mixer or whisk until soft peaks form. Stir about one-quarter of the egg whites into ricotta mixture and then fold in remaining whites gently but thoroughly. Squeeze excess water from zucchini in colander, then fold into batter. Heat skillet over medium heat. Add butter or coconut oil to skillet and melt. Pour 1/4 cup (60 mL) batter for each pancake into pan and cook for 2 minutes per side, or until golden. To keep pancakes warm, transfer them onto baking sheet in preheated 200 F (90 C) oven as you go. Serves 4. Each serving contains: 344 calories; 18 g protein; 16 g total fat (8 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 33 g total carbohydrates (9 g sugars, 3 g fibre); 403 mg sodium Power up with protein Most of us know that protein is important for building muscle mass—but how much should we eat, and when? After exercising, chow down on foods that contain no more than 10 to 20 grams of protein. These Zucchini Ricotta Pancakes are packed with 18 grams of strength-promoting protein, making them a smart (and delicious!) post-workout meal. source: " Squash It! ", alive #383, September 2014